Contact us at :

Email : gedesuyasa@yahoo.com or gedesuyasa4@gmail.com
Mobile phone : +6281-23632-081
Whatsapp :+6287-8777-83571

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Such a memorable & wonderful trip ever !

“Such a memorable & wonderful trip ever !” 5 of 5 starsReviewed October 20, 2014 we had been there for 5 days 4 nights. Gede was our trip driver + tour guide + private photographer. He is a super nice man & he always give us useful information & advisor as well. His car is very clean and comfortable. we had really awesome experiences & best services in Bali ! Appreciated that gave us so much unforgettable memories & 100 % will find you again once we visit to Bali again !! Thanks Gede ^.^ Visited October 2014

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Trip to Bali

A trip to Bali is not really complete without visiting at least one temple. The island has over 20,000 pura (temples in Balinese) and even though it’s impossible to visit them all, a few of them are really worth the time and effort. Plus, many of them are close to each other, so you can visit several in one day. I visited these five temples over two days and managed to see rice terraces, a butterfly farm and other Bali sights, too. How to dress : Remember to bring a sarong if you visit a temple. Most temple guards will ask that you cover up your shoulders and ankles, but if you’re wearing pants and a tee, there shouldn’t be a problem. If you don’t have a sarong, you can borrow one for free at most temples. At Besakih, it’s included in your entrance fee so don’t let anyone there convince you otherwise. Unfortunately, the place is crammed with people trying to rip you off! Prices : Visiting a Balinese temple is cheap (cost is between $1-3), but there are different prices for foreigners and locals. You can find the prices below. How to get there : There are three main ways to see the temples. You either sign up for a group tour, you rent a driver (what I did) or you rent a scooter. The latter is definitely the cheapest, but sitting on a scooter all day is probably not the most comfortable way to enjoy Bali’s temples. Remember, if you bring a few friends, you can split the costs which makes it a lot cheaper.

Friday, August 29, 2014

Monkey forest

The Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary is a Balinese Hindu site at the bottom of Monkey Forest Road and populated by cheeky long-tailed macaques. It's a popular site with visitors to Ubud who come to see the monkeys and the temples within the sanctuary. There are hundreds of monkeys living in and around the monkey forest. You can purchase food for them at the entrance gate but be warned that the monkeys are aggresive opportunists - particularly in their pursuit of food. They will think nothing of climbing on you or raking through your bag in search of something edible. There are 3 temples within the forest, Pura Dalem (death temple), the Holy Bathing Temple and Pura Prajapati (funerary or cremation temple). All 3 of these temples are sacred, as is the forest and the monkeys, who are believed to protect the area from evil spirits.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Great Tour Guide

“Great tour guide ” 5 of 5 starsReviewed August 18, 2014 NEW Gede is not just a driver, but a great tour guide. My experience with him was wonderful and very informational. He not only takes you on day trips throughout Bali, but teaches you about the history of the Balinese people. Gede is very trustworthy, dependable, humble, and very pleasant to be around. He speaks English very well and will recommend different places for you to visit. The itinerary depends on the places you want to visit and he will ensure you get adequate time to do everything on the trip. I had Gede for a two day trip, which was extraordinary! If you are looking for someone to show you Bali on your own terms, look no further because Gede is your tour guide!

Gede enriched our Balinese experience

“Gede enriched our Balinese experience” 5 of 5 starsReviewed August 19, 2014 NEW We recently spent two weeks in Bali and again used Gede Suyasa as our driver and guide. Before the trip, Gede helped us develop our itinerary and choose hotels/resorts to stay. Gede is absolutely prompt, dependable, honest, patient and helpful. He offers good advice, but also listens to what we want to do, what interests us, and then helped us achieve those things. For example, we like real Indonesian food rather than the watered down variety you get in most tourist places, so Gede took us to, or recommended warungs or restaurants we could find what we wanted. We stayed in three different places, and our trips between were fascinating tours through towns, sites of interest, and countryside, where possible on back roads that could avoid traffic. Where we couldn't avoid traffic, we still had an insight into Balinese life and could talk about all kinds of issues. Our one-day tours were enjoyable. We really like Gede and always recommend him to our friends.

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Creamation

Within Hinduism, cremation (utilizing fire to reduce a dead body to ashes) is a process that is believed to set an individual's soul free from the body and allow that soul to take part in the reincarnation process. Historically, Balinese Hindu cremation ceremonies have been conducted in such as way as to provide a deceased individual with an elaborate tribute and send off. Many Balinese families have traditionally not been able to afford to cremate the body of a deceased relative immediately after that person's death (today, it is not uncommon for a Balinese Hindu cremation ceremony to cost a family the equivalent of a years income). Therefore, many Balinese families opt to bury the body of their relative (in a cemetery like the one found within the Sacred Monkey Forest of Padangtegal), work for several years in order to save up enough money for a cremation ceremony, and have the body of their relative exhumed just prior to his or her cremation. Historically, most Balinese Hindu cemetery and cremation sites were located in remote areas (areas that were not within or immediately next to a village). An exception to this rule is cemetery sites utilized by upper caste Balinese (which have traditionally been located within family compounds). Today, although bodies are still buried within the Sacred Monkey Forest's cemetery, bodies are not cremated within the Sacred Monkey Forest. Instead, bodies are exhumed and prepared for cremation. Cremation preparation has traditionally involved the washing and wrapping a body in cloth (after being buried, most bodies have decomposed to the point that only bones remain). After a body is prepared for cremation, it is brought to another location where it is placed upon a cremation pyre. On the day of the cremation ceremony, village members carry the cremation pyre (and other pyres containing belongings of the deceased person) to the cremation site. However, cremation processions do not go directly to the cremation site and the cremation pyre, as the procession moves along , is turned around in circles. This is to insure that once a soul is released from a person's body, that soul will not be able to find its way back to the village. After a body is cremated, ashes and any remaining bones (after being washed) are placed in urns and distributed to family members. Some of the ashes and bones, as an aspect of Ancestor Worship, are placed in family temples (which are located in family compounds). Remaining ashes and bones are both caste into the sea and placed at several major Balinese Hindu temple sites.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Relieable Driver

“If you are looking for a reliable, honest and safe driver to drive you around Bali, Gede is the man!” 5 of 5 starsReviewed July 29, 2014 NEW As any prudent 1st time tourist will do, I scanned the Trip Advisor looking for reliable and proven driver/guide to drive my family around Bali during our week long vacation in June 14. The myraid of choices were indeed mind boggling! After reading through pages after pages of reviews, I finally selected Mr Gede as my driver/guide. And I think that was one of the best decision I made for the trip! The price charged by Mr Gede might not be the cheapest nor the most expensive, they were reasonable and worth every cent! I booked 3 full days tour (up to 10 hours per day) with Mr Gede and he kindly threw in a free airport to hotel transfer. How nice! On arrival at the Bali airport, Mr Gede stood among hundreds of other drivers who held up name cards at the arrival meeters hall, and the experience was quite overwhelming as we need to look for our name on a tiny A4 size paper! It could be Mr Gede's experience, he quickly identified my family and ushered us to his brand new Suzuki APV. During the short 5 mins drive from the airport to my hotel at Kuta, I felt more assured of my choice as through our conversation, I could tell that Mr Gede is really a typical down to earth and friendly Balinese family man! During the 3 days tour, Mr Gede was always punctual, friendly, and along with his keen sense of direction (as if he had swallowed a mobile GPS), he traversed the narrow roads in Bali like a pro! When asked how can he drive in such a chaotic environment, he told us in a very 'Zen' like manner 'to drive in Bali, you must flow with the traffic like water flowing in a river' Wow! During one of the days, my daughter ran a high fever and we have no choice but to call Mr Gede to cancel our day tour. As we were only an hour from the pick up time, he could have charged me for the day's fare or maybe half instead he did none of that and expressed his concern for my daughter. My wife and I were really touched by Mr Gede's kindness! In short, Mr Gede showed us the true meaning of Balinese style hospitality and I have no qualms recommending him to any 1st time tourists or returning tourists to Bali and did I also said that he is also very good with young children!

Friday, June 27, 2014

“Awesome Service, highly reccomended”

“Awesome Service, highly reccomended” 5 of 5 starsReviewed June 26, 2014 NEW Thanks heaps again for the two days spent with you, your help and understanding was highly appreciated. Gede driving skills were also a plus, a smooth and comfortable ride, bali roads are crazy so it made our experience a lot better than previous tours we had been on. Gedes knowledge and honesty of Bali was both helpful and informative. We have recommended you to our friends and hope you hear from them next month. Also we were able to get the buffalo head into Australia through customs with out any problems so we were over the moon. We have since found them on eBay selling for approx $600 au so over the moon on our purchase. Visited June 2014

Friday, June 20, 2014

Tanah Lot The Most Favorite Tourist Destination

Tanah Lot The Most Favorite Tourist DestinationTanah Lot located in Beraban village, Tabanan regency, 18 kilometer to the west from Denpasar, is the most favorite location in Bali both for the domestic and foreign tourists. The tourists love to see the two temples built on the big rock and the other one on the cliff. Tanah Lot Temple is a part of Sad Kahyangan Temple, one of big temples on the island. Tanah Lot location managed professionally so that tourist would love to visit the place as the road is good, the parking lot is wide and its environment arranged beautifully. Out of many tourism objects in Bali, Tanah Lot gets high demand from both domestic and foreign tourists and it is the most crowded place visited by tourists. Tourism Department of Bali Province recorded that the number of tourists both from Indonesia and overseas visited Tanah Lot in the last five years is still the highest. The number of tourists coming to Tanah Lot in 2012 was 2.577. 299 people consist of 1,649,655 domestic tourists and 927.644 foreigners and in 2013 was 2.842.281 people consist of 1.805.193 domestic tourists and 1.037.088 foreigners, it increased at 10.28 percent. It is reasonable that Tanah Lot gets the most visited tourist attraction, said Made Sudiana, a local guide, besides its location is near from the tourism center in Kuta and Nusa Dua, in here the tourists could enjoy the beach view and temple, which none in the world could compete. Moreover, this tourist attraction offers arts performance in the form of ‘kecak’ for tourists with the background of ocean and temple view. (BTN/015)

Saturday, June 7, 2014

Tumpek Landep A moment for Purification of Ancestral Heritages

Tumpek LandepTumpek Landep is celebrated every Saniscara (Saturday) Kliwon Wuku Landep. The phrase Tumpek Landep is derived from the word tumpek meaning close and landep meaning sharp. So, in the philosophical context, Tumpek Landep poses a milestone of sharpening the citta, buddhi and manas (mind). Therefore, people always behave according to clarity of mind with the foundation of religious values. With a pure mind, devotees will be able to pick and choose what is good and bad. Tumpek Landep poses veneration to Lord Shiva Pasupati as the god of taksu or divine inspiration. So, after celebrating the Sarasvati Day as the coming down of science, people invoke in order the science will be auspicious or gives sharpness of mind and heart. On the Tumpek Landep is also performed a cleansing and purification ritual to different ancestral heritages such as keris dagger, spears and so forth. Layman often considers it the anniversary of iron or metal. However, over the period, the meaning of Tumpek Landep increasingly deviates from the true meaning. Now, the community even tends to interpret the Tumpek Landep as a ceremony for motorcycles, cars and equipment made from the iron works. Indeed, this is very much distorted. It is okay to perform a ritual on Tumpek Landep to motorcycles, cars and working equipment, but do not forget the core of implementation of Tumpek Landep itself so that people always remember to sharpen their mind (manas), buddhi and citta. By doing so, people are expected to fight against ignorance, darkness and misery. Ritual of Tumpek Landep actually reminds people of always sharpening the mind so as to suppress the evil behavior within the self. In terms of the meaning of feast day, the ritual to motorcycles, cars or working equipment is more appropriately carried out on Tumpek Kuningan, namely as a thanksgiving for the facility gift of Supreme God. Hopefully, the facilities can help the activities and function well and safely. Tumpek Landep poses a milestone for introspection to improve the character pursuant to religious teachings. On Tumpek Landep, devotees should do worship in family shrine as well as in temple to invoke the blessing of Lord Shiva Pasupati to be given the sharpness of mind so that we can become a useful person to society. It is also resumed with the cleaning and purification of the ancestral heritages. For the artists, Tumpek Landep is celebrated as a worship to invoke divine inspiration so the art becomes more developed, gains an appreciation from the community and ability to convey a moral and intellectual messages to educate people. Again, it is affirmed that Tumpek Landep is not ritual for motorcycles, cars, furniture or iron, but it is more about the awareness of always sharpening the mind for the welfare of mankind. It’s okay to give ritual to motorcycles, cars and so forth as a form of gratitude, but it is only the additional value. Do not let the celebration focuses on the added values, but forget the basic core of the celebration. (BTN/ist/015)